top of page

Common Types of Ostomy Surgeries

COLOSTOMY

A colostomy is a surgically created opening in the abdomen through which a small portion of the colon is brought up to the surface of the skin. This new opening, called a stoma, allows stool to pass directly out of the body, bypassing a diseased or damaged section of the colon. In some patients, this section may be removed. There are four main types of colostomies, named after the portion of the bowel where the colostomy is located:

ASCENDING COLOSTOMY
Output will be liquid, rich in digestive enzymes and irritating to the skin around the stoma. Output will be frequent.

TRANSVERSE LOOP COLOSTOMY

Waste will be liquid to semi-solid, and less irritating to the skin. Output will be less frequent.

DESCENDING COLOSTOMY

Waste will be semi-solid to solid as water has been removed during passage through the preceding large bowel. Output is non-irritating to skin and less frequent.

DESCENDING COLOSTOMY

Waste will be semi-solid to solid as water has been removed during passage through the preceding large bowel. Output is non-irritating to skin and less frequent.

SIGMOID COLOSTOMY

Waste will be formed and similar to that of an intact bowel. Output is non-irritating to skin and occurs at certain times of day or night, depending on diet and when one eats.

ILEOSTOMY

Severe cases of ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease may be treated by the surgical creation of an ileostomy, where the end of the ileum is brought to the surface of the skin. The colon may be left intact in order to heal and allow the patient to be reconnected, or, in many cases it will be removed entirely. Its function, reabsorbing salt, electrolytes and water will be carried out to some degree by the small intestine. Ileostomies are active at frequent intervals throughout the day, usually after a meal.

UROSTOMY

urostomy, or urinary diversion is a surgically created opening in the abdomen that allows urine to pass directly out of the body. Most commonly performed to remove bladder cancer, a urostomy may also be necessary where interstitial cystitus or some types of kidney disease are present, or if there is severe injury to the urinary tract. Urostomies are always on the right side of the body, and generally have very little or no odor. Waste will collect throughout the day and night. Some patients employ a night drainage system to collect urine while they are sleeping.

bottom of page